With new technology hitting the market every day, there is always something new for photographers to add to their “bag of tricks.” Recently there has been an onslaught of drones hitting the market as these image-capturing flying machines become more popular. At the May PSC meeting, Jeff Roush, who does drone photography, will address the whole concept of “drone photography” and where it fits into what photographers do.

Jeff Roush is a 40-year veteran to the advertising, portraiture, wedding, and professional photographic field. His career has led him from his beginnings in the late 70s in Toledo, Ohio, to the West Coast, where he spent 11 years in Los Angeles and Phoenix. He now makes his home in west Tennessee. Jeff has worked for quite a few Fortune 500 companies over the years, photographing products for their marketing materials and doing their annual reports.

Currently, Jeff participates in a number of Tennessee photography clubs, and he is the President of the Camera Club Council of Tennessee. Very active in sponsoring, teaching, and organizing photography workshops and fieldtrips around the USA, Jeff presently teaches several weekend workshops in Tennessee and also a few in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado. These programs are informative and educational along with being a great time for all who attend.

While teaching privately and at the college level, Jeff  discovered a real need for a new educational approach to young photographers. So, in 2001, he  developed several in-depth online digital photography programs and courses of his own. He now carries an enrollment of about 100 students at any given time in these programs, while he also teaches in the classroom at several local colleges around west Tennessee.

Jeff says, “I feel very fortunate to be able to say that I’ve spent most of my life doing what I love – photography, and then teaching what I have learned to others. When you do what you love you don’t feel like you ever work. I find teaching extremely rewarding; there is nothing like the look on a student’s face when he/she figures out something new that will make them a better photographic artist.”